Pediatric Occupational Therapy PLLC.


FAQS


What is Occupational Therapy (OT)?

Occupational therapy is a rehabilitative field that helps people with disabilities, or impairments perform their daily activities so that they can function optimally. In pediatric occupational therapy, occupations refer to all the activities that occupy and give meaning to a child’s life, climbing, catching a ball, writing their name, cutting with a scissor or tying their shoes. The occupational therapist evaluates the child’s fine motor, visual perceptual, sensory processing, gross motor and social skills. Therapy sessions use play to help children improve their skills  for greater success at home, in school, and on the playground.

What is Sensory processing?

In order for children to successfully interact with their environment and move through space in an alert and organized manner they must be able to continually receive, interpret, and organize sensory information to produce appropriate responses. The ability to make sense of the world around them and function appropriately throughout the day is dependent on proper Neural-wiring and processing of sensory input from the auditory (sound), visual (sight), gustatory (taste), tactile (touch), vestibular (balance/movement), and proprioceptive (muscle/joint) senses.



What is Sensory Processing Dysfunction (SPD)?


The nervous system is unable to properly process or organize sensory information. SPD can affect all areas of life: fine and gross motor development, including self-help, visual perception, behavior, socialization, and speech. A child with SPD may struggle with daily tasks such as writing, putting on a jacket, following a teacher’s directions in a busy, noisy classroom, taking a bath or shower, playing on the playground. These seemingly simple tasks can be extremely challenging, frustrating, and scary for a child with SPD.

What is Sensory Integrative Therapy?

Children are provided with the correct amount, intensity and type of sensory input their nervous system needs to function properly. When the nervous system is processing information correctly the child is then able to produce appropriate responses. The therapist guides the child through activities that are specifically designed to provide sensory input that will challenge
the child at his/her respective level. Sensory integrative therapy leads to improved behavior, skills, competence, and confidence. 

Who can benefit from OT service?
Any child who is experiencing developmental delays that interfere with his/her daily functioning.

How can I get my child started in OT? 

The first step is to get a prescription from your pediatrician ordering an OT evaluation and treatment if necessary. If your child already has a recent thorough evaluation therapy services can begin immediately. 

How long is treatment?

The length of time a child is in therapy is dependent on the child’s particular needs and the follow through at home


How can I make sure my child gets the most out of therapy?


Parent and/or caregiver involvement is a critical part of treatment. In order to reinforce progress made during the OT sessions, a home program, specifically designed for your child by the occupational therapist, should be deligently followed. 

Will my insurance pay for the OT sessions? 

Spring Ahead Pediatric Occupational Therapy is not an in-network provider; however, many insurance plans cover out-of-network OT services. Each month an invoice with proper codes for services will be provided to you so that you can submit to your insurance company.